Science in the Classroom with iPad

Having had a few days to recover from BETT, I have also been reflecting on the weeks events and experiences. I thought I would also summarise each of the workshops I ran, and sum up the workflows and apps I covered. The first workshop was really a continuation of the science workshop I ran last year at BETT but I was also keen to try to squeeze some pedagogy into the 25 minute session too.

The workshop began by looking at investigative science and experimental write ups. At GCSE and A/IB level, this is an important skill and the iPad offers very practical tools to facilitate this.

Looking at an IB level chemistry experiment investigating Beers law, I demonstrated Labdisc by Globisens. You can read more about Labdisc here. Using the biochem lab discs built in colorimeter, I measured the light transmission of various copper sulphate solutions demoing how to take manual readings with the Labdisc.

IMG_8786

I recorded the data into a Numbers spreadsheet and demonstrated how the data could be simply turned into a graph and the unknown solution marked on the graph. Switching apps between Pages and Numbers allowed me to write up the app and copy data created in Numbers to create results for the experiment. Adding photos of the experiment captured using the iPad cameras helps to create visual hooks to help students recall and remember experimental procedures. I won’t argue that this is hardly transformational, but there’s no arguing the iPad is a versatile classroom tool, allowing data logging, spreadsheet and word processing capabilities with a built in camera. Add wifi access to more information than anyone could ever absorb, and  while it’s nothing other tech doesn’t allow us to do, the iPad allows it to be done more simply and quickly. Isn’t this what we want our tech to enable us to do?

Next we moved onto Physics….I’ve already written a post about the last app I showed, cstr physics (you can read it here). I started this section by demonstrating a free fall experiment that can be done with the Labdisc and a table tennis ball. Dovi (the CEO of Globisens has a nice video of this experiment here)….

I then discussed how the iPad gives us ways of doing things that were either impossible of very difficult previously.

VIDEO PHYSICS

Using Video Physics by Vernier (you can download here – it costs £2.99), we looked at carrying out the same experiment using motion analysis. This allows you to either record or use video previously recorded on the iPad, and use motion analysis software to track an object. The app will also produce graphs of the data captured, and this can be exported for further analysis in software such as logger pro. It is also possible to create a video file with graphs etc, embedded. Not all of the graphs produced are really very useful, but for the price this is an amazing tool, and with the ability to easily share files to Logger Pro, there is substantial classroom potential for this app for a whole range of speed and acceleration experiments, and also what about using it in PE to analyse sports movements such as throwing a basketball, kicking a football or hitting a tennis ball. This app is well worth looking at particularly if you have access to Logger Pro software in your school (more info here).

The final part of the workshop looked at Biology, and I discussed ways that a topic such as heart, blood and circulation could be covered. I’m currently putting together separate posts about some of the gadgets and apps I used during the Biology part of the workshop, and will link them here when I have posted them.

I was really pleased both with how the workshops went at BETT and by the amount of positive feedback from teachers who attended the workshop. Combining some really useful apps and a couple of gadgets such as the Airmicro and Labdisc, the iPad can be a very versatile tool for science learning, allowing us to support learning in wholly new and exciting ways.

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