More iPad gadgets for science

I probably have more than my fair share of gadgets and peripherals for the iPad and iPhone, but two that have been particularly useful in the science classroom are the focus of this post.

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The first is called Airmicro and is a wireless microscope. This gadget (which has been likened to an otoscope (for looking into ears)by friends, and an electric drill by airport security) creates it own wireless network using 3 AA batteries. Using one of several iOS apps, you can then connect your iPad to the wireless network it creates. The objective lens can be changed and a variety of lenses from 15x to 400x magnifications are available.

While not cheap (around £400, lenses vary from round £50 to £200), there are a couple of things that make this a really useful tool in the classroom. Traditionally, decent quality video microscopes are expensive enough that a school is not likely to have more than one of them. Inevitably, lessons involving video microscope work end up actively involving a minority of the class.

With the Airmicro, students can also connect to microscope using the app and capture their own pictures. The Mytech app (download here – free) also allows student to overlay a scale to take measurements much like using an eyepiece graticule with a conventional microscope. This means students can actively participate in lessons, even if there is only one Airmicro. This also makes it much easier to share the images captured under the microscope too.

We have used this very successfully in the classroom and although not designed to work with traditional microscope slides, we have had a good deal of success using the Airmicro attached to a clamp and stand and placing a sheet of white paper behind the slide.

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I bought my Airmicro from the Japanese manufacturer (Scalar – click here for more info), but there are also UK and US distributors now I think.

The second gadget I want to highlight is the Withings Blood Pressure monitor. Available from the Apple Store online and other resellers, this connects directly to the iPad using the dock connector (not currently lightning connector though). It does exactly what the name suggests and is a blood pressure cuff which is controlled by a free app on the iPad (you can download the app here).

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Again, in the classroom, I don’t think there is any need to have a lot of these, but when studying a unit on the heart and circulation for example, a really nice starter to each lesson of the unit could be to pass the blood pressure monitor around the classroom and have the students measure their blood pressure. Over the course of the unit, the students would build up a graph of their own blood pressure at different times of the day/week, and could be asked to investigate reasons for differences, for example. At around £100 this is not the cheapest science add on for the iPad but like the Airmicro could be another useful tool to maximise your investment in iOS devices.

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